Karma Police

“Karma Police” is a song from one of Radiohead’s arguably greatest albums, OK Computer. Karma is the Hindu theory of cause and effect, in this case Radiohead created a “karma police” to catch people in their acts. The lyrics of the song criticize a man and a woman. The narrator is criticizing a man that “talks in maths” and “buzzes like a fridge; like a detuned radio” and implies that the man is doing something wrong; when in reality, there is nothing wrong with him. The narrator proceeds to criticize a woman for having a “Hitler hairdo” that is making the narrator feel ill. These outrageous criticisms portrays society as having unreasonable criticisms and always finding faults in people. Towards the end of the song, the narrator says “for a minute there I lost myself” which may mean that he/she has realized their wrong criticisms.

Radiohead makes the type of music that you would sit down, relax, and listen to. The music that Radiohead produces has a very distinct sound. Thom Yorke, the lead singer, has a very eerie voice (eerie in a good way). His voice sends chills down your spine and gives you goosebumps while the instrumentals provide the songs with rhythm and tempo.

Why would any band name a song title “Karma Police”? Well, why did Charles Dickens name his novel A Tale of Two Cities; why did Ray Bradbury name his novel Fahrenheit 451; why did Homer name his epic poem The Odyssey? The title of any work of literature or art is one of the most important parts of the work itself. The title is the first thing a person reads and looks at, not only does it provide the reader with what the song or story will be about it’s also a great way to catch a person’s attention. The obscure title makes people wonder what this song could possibly about. Why wasn’t the song named “Criticisms” or just “Karma”? The details of all famous works of literature and art were carefully chosen and written by the author; which is what makes it a work of art, everything was chosen for perfection.

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